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The view from jamestown perstorp pevalen podcast jenny klevas anders magnusson

Perstorp Pevalen Discussion | The View, Podcast Edition – Episode 034

Episode 034 of The View from Jamestown, Podcast Edition is a discussion with Perstorp on their new-to-market plasticizer product, Pevalen.  

Featuring:

Jenny Klevas – Perstorp, Market Segment Manager Polyolester Plasticizers
Anders Magnusson – Perstorp, Technical Manager Plasticizers
Ben Sawicki – The Chemical Company, Marketing & Sales Specialist

Pevalen Information:

https://www.perstorp.com/en/products/pevalen

Pricing updates courtesy of PetroChem Wire: bit.ly/2sFuZWl
Production by Kettlebottom Creative: www.kettlebottomcreative.com 

November 2019 View from Jamestown Podcast The Chemical Company

November 2019 | The View, Podcast Edition – Episode 033

The November 2019 View from Jamestown Podcast from The Chemical Company includes a discussion on the global chemical industry, including price updates, market trends, featured products and more.

Featured topics include:

– Global chemical storage industry expected up 4% over the next five years
– Supply chain management, “Security of Supply” and planning in 2019/2020
– Feature on ESO, and outlook on the soybean industry for 2020

TCC Staff includes:

Robb Roach: President
Ken Blanchard: VP Business Development
AJ Petrarca: VP Sales and Marketing
Ben Sawicki: Marketing & Sales Specialist

Pricing updates courtesy of PetroChem Wire: bit.ly/2sFuZWl
Production by Kettlebottom Creative: www.kettlebottomcreative.com

Discussion with The Vinyl Institute Episode 032 The View from Jamestown

Discussion with the Vinyl Institute – Episode 032

Episode 032 is an interview and discussion with the Vinyl Institute’s CEO Ned Monroe. In this episode, Ned walks listeners through an introduction of the VI, their core goals and plans, as well as a 12-month out look on the Vinyl Industry and their plans for regulatory and sustainability goals.

Links & URLs:

The Vinyl Institute
www.vinylinfo.org/

+Vantage Vinyl
vantagevinyl.com/

Ned Monroe – President & CEO
Office: (202)765-2281
Email: nmonroe@vinylinfo.org

The Chemical Company
www.thechemco.com
www.thechemco.com/podcast

The View from Jamestown Podcast The Chemical Company September 2019

September 2019 | The View, Podcast Edition – Episode 030

The September 2019 View from Jamestown Podcast from The Chemical Company includes a discussion on the global chemical industry, including price updates, market trends, featured products and more.

Featured topics include:

– DINP Non-Hazardous classification in the US
– Update on the Rhine River & European Logistics
– China / US Tariffs Might Increase for October

Pricing updates courtesy of PetroChem Wire: bit.ly/2sFuZWl
Production by Kettlebottom Creative: www.kettlebottomcreative.com

the chemical company the view from jamestown podcast episode 027

June 2019 | The View, Podcast Edition – Episode 027

The June 2019 View from Jamestown Podcast from The Chemical Company includes a discussion on the global chemical industry, including price updates, market trends, featured products and more.

Featured topics include:

– Global Tariff & Trade Update
– TCC Product Manager Cory Mullins: Methanol, Butanol, 2-EH

Pricing updates courtesy of PetroChem Wire: bit.ly/2sFuZWl
Production by Kettlebottom Creative: www.kettlebottomcreative.com

Tariff & Trade Discussion with SOCMA | The View, Podcast Edition – Episode 026

Matthew Moedritzer works as a Manager of Legal and Government Relations for SOCMA, better known as the Society of Chemical Manufacturers & Affiliates. Matt closely monitors various geopolitical situations, tariff and trade negotiations and changes, and more, and on Episode 026 he closely analyzes each situation as it stands today.

Episode 026 of The View from Jamestown, Podcast Edition includes macro-level news surrounding various global trade, tariff and duty updates and changes.

Time Stamps & Topics:
6:15 – US / EU Airbus Tariffs
12:30 – Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB)
23:10 – Brexit
29:25 – China / US
48:30 – India / Turkey GSP
54:00 – USMCA (aka NAFTA 2.0)
1:00:30 – Resources

Matt Moedritzer
(571) 348-5123
moedritzerm@socma.com

Featured topics include:

– US / EU Airbus Tariff
– Miscellaneous Tariff Bill (MTB)
– Brexit
– US / China Trade
– India & Turkey GSP
– USMCA (aka: NAFTA 2.0)

 

Links & URLs

TCC’s Website: bit.ly/2NNJEc9
TCC’s Product Listing: bit.ly/2NMOxlP
Contact TCC: bit.ly/2TjcIOW

Backlinks to TCC’s Podcast:

TCC’s Official Podcast Page: bit.ly/2GJMviM
iTunes: apple.co/2IzzhGd
Google Play: bit.ly/2MAySZH
Soundcloud: bit.ly/2HOI1XQ
YouTube: bit.ly/2uNQZma

The View from Jamestown: Mobile App

Web: bit.ly/2Cd2ckj
iTunes: apple.co/2rfyPWz
Google Play: bit.ly/2FAQwE0

Pricing updates courtesy of PetroChem Wire: bit.ly/2sFuZWl
Production by Kettlebottom Creative.

China Import Duty Increases to 25%

The Office of the United States Trade Representative officially released a modification to Section 301 Action regarding China’s Acts and duties on approximately 5,700 products imported from China. The revised mandate will take effect at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, May 10, 2019. Imported cargo departing China after this deadline will be subject to a 25% duty, up from the previous 10%.
According to Reuters, U.S. Customs and Border Protection have announced a grace period for materials affected under the Section 301 tariffs. If product departed China before 12:01 a.m. on May 10, it will be subject to the previous 10% duty, not the new 25% tariff.
The Chemical Company is continuing to monitor the tariff situation and will provide further updates and details as they are available.
For more information:
May 2019 | The View, Podcast Edition - Episode 025

May 2019 | The View, Podcast Edition – Episode 025

The May 2019 View from Jamestown Podcast from The Chemical Company includes a discussion on the global chemical industry, including price updates, market trends, featured products and more.

Featured topics include:

– Potential U.S. / European Tariffs Oncoming
– Latin American Geopolitical Update
– Featured Summer / Warm Month Products

Links & URLs

TCC’s Website: bit.ly/2NNJEc9
TCC’s Product Listing: bit.ly/2NMOxlP
Contact TCC: bit.ly/2TjcIOW

Backlinks to TCC’s Podcast:

TCC’s Official Podcast Page: bit.ly/2GJMviM
iTunes: apple.co/2IzzhGd
Google Play: bit.ly/2MAySZH
Soundcloud: bit.ly/2HOI1XQ
YouTube: bit.ly/2uNQZma

The View from Jamestown: Mobile App

Web: bit.ly/2Cd2ckj
iTunes: apple.co/2rfyPWz
Google Play: bit.ly/2FAQwE0

Pricing updates courtesy of PetroChem Wire: bit.ly/2sFuZWl
Production by Kettlebottom Creative.

growth in the chemical industry the chemical company

Unpacking Recent Growth in the U.S. Chemical Space

unpacking growth in the US chemical space the chemical company

Business leaders across all industries are keeping an eye on 2019, wondering whether favorable marketplace conditions might materialize. For executives overseeing enterprises in the U.S. chemicals space or other sector-adjacent organizations, the outlook for 2019 is quite favorable. Production in the states is expected to rise 3.6 percent over the forthcoming 12-month span as manufacturers introduce new higher-capacity workflows and demand in key market increases, according to research from the American Chemistry Council. These developments are likely to lay the foundation for long-term growth, ACC analysts found, vaulting revenue beyond $700 billion by 2023. However, paired with this maturation are a number of significant challenges that American chemical companies will have to address over the course of 2019 and beyond. So as executives and other key stakeholders in the U.S. chemicals space prepare for the coming year, it essential that they weigh every variable in this complicated growth equation.

Dissecting the industry upside

The American chemicals industry has been on the upswing for the past three years, with manufacturers making considerable production headway due, in part, to rising demand within the automotive sector, ICIS reported. Here, the average vehicle rolls out of the factory equipped with $3,500 worth of chemical products. Housing has also been a boon for the sector, along with the oil and gas and mining spaces. However, the strengthening U.S. manufacturing is perhaps the biggest driver behind the ongoing growth within the American chemicals arena. Output and capacity in this sector, whose members consume countless chemical compounds during the production process, have risen steadily for the last decade, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics analyzed by the Federal Reserve. These trends have greatly benefited the stateside chemical space, which now appears to be poised for additional expansion over the next year.

Grappling with future challenges

That said, there are some burgeoning roadblocks that might hold U.S. chemical companies back in 2019, beginning with the declining state of the global marketplace. Chemical manufacturers outside of the U.S. are struggling as a consequence of numerous variables, including the emergence of protectionist trade policy, according to researchers for PricewaterhouseCoopers. Global chemical production decreased in the opening weeks of the fourth quarter, continuing an underwhelming year for sector in general, ACC analysts found. This is likely to continue into 2019, which might drag on the U.S. industry even as it grows. Unfortunately, the industry is expected to face additional challenges stemming from another corner of the global marketplace: the manufacturing sector. Manufacturing firms worldwide are grappling with several serious issues – most notably severe labor shortages and rising raw material prices, Reuters reported. Consequently, economists foresee the arrival of strong financial headwinds that threaten not only manufacturers operating abroad but also those based in the U.S. Should adverse developments materialize in this arena, American chemical companies could certainly feel the effects.

In addition to these relatively recent roadblocks, chemical manufacturers in the states continue to deal with several long-standing issues. Enterprise digitization, for instance, continues to pose problems for businesses in the industry, according to consultants for PwC. While most recognize that they must rejigger their internal processes and workflows to meet the needs of technology-savvy customers and keep pace with forward-thinking competitors, pinpointing and implementing the right digital tools continues to be a challenge for chemical companies everywhere.

Making the most out of the market

The businesses that populate the American chemicals sector have solid footing in the marketplace and appear to be in a strong position entering 2019, according to the ACC. However, it is essential that these firms continue to pursue operational improvement, as there are a variety of pitfalls in play here at home and abroad.

 

Cleaning Water The Chemical Company

Understanding the Chemical Industry’s Role in Water Treatment Operations

Cleaning Water The Chemical Company

Drinking water quality measures worldwide have reached historic highs. Today, an estimated 71 percent of the global population has access to safe drinking water, according to researchers from the World Health Organization. The U.S. boasts some of the cleanest supplies on the planet, as 94 percent of its residents can take advantage of pollutant-free aquifers, pipes and fixtures. Numerous parties laid the foundation for this progress, here and abroad. From government institutions and nonprofit organizations to private enterprises, countless entities have contributed to drinking water decontamination efforts across the globe. Surprisingly, chemical companies are among these H20-conscious groups.

Businesses within the global chemicals space have long provided the synthetic materials needed for water treatment operations. These organizations produced more than $24 billion worth of such products in 2018 alone and are expected to generate another $25 billion in water treatment chemicals this year, according to projections from BlueWeave Consulting and Research. In short, chemical companies play an essential role in drinking water decontamination programs and will continue to do so as these initiatives expand.

Unpacking the water treatment equation

Here in the U.S., water treatment unfolds at the community level. Independent public drinking water systems across the country sanitize the supplies found within local aquifers and transport the clean end product to individual homes, per the Centers for Disease Control. The decontamination portion of this process features four distinct phases:

  • Coagulation and flocculation: Water treatment teams introduce positively-charged chemicals to untreated water. This neutralizes the negative charges carried by dissolved sediment and draws these particles together, creating larger, easier-to-handle dirt flecks called floc.
  • Sedimentation: The floc sinks to the bottom of the supply and settles there.
  • Filtration: With the larger contaminants resting at the base of the supply, water treatment personnel run the purified water above through a series of filters that collect particles still present in the H20, including charcoal, gravel and sand. These fixtures also catch microorganisms such as bacteria, parasites and viruses.
  • Disinfection: Following filtration, a number of disinfectants are put into the supply to eliminate any lingering bacteria and inoculate the water against any of the germs it might pick up will traveling through delivery infrastructure.

This water purification methodology has proven extremely effective domestically, despite the scale at which it is deployed. However, this is not the only strategy communities around the world use to rid their supplies of harmful particles. For instance, some leverage slow sand filtration, a much simpler and more cost-effective technique, according to the WHO. That said, the approach outlined above is perhaps the most dominant water treatment procedure in Western nations with access to ample capital and manpower.

Understanding the role of chemical companies



Enterprises within the chemical production arena provide the solutions that propel the water treatment process deployed here in the States. Aluminum sulfate and other inorganic substances are used during the coagulation process, neutralizing the charged ions attached to dangerous contaminants and making them more manageable, per the Minnesota Rural Water Association. Chemicals facilitate flocculation too. All manner of molecular polymers are used here, lending loosened particles the magnetic attraction that allows them to bunch and sink the bottom of supplies in the moments before sedimentation.

And finally, chemical compounds make drinking water disinfection possible at scale, according to the American Chemistry Council. Chlorine is the dominant product here and has been for more than a century. The U.S. and Canadian government began using chlorine to treat drinking water during the early 1900s and have relied heavily on the chemical ever since. Why? Chlorine is an effective germ killer and can easily dispatch waterborne microorganisms, while keeping funguses and harmful chemicals such as ammonia and nitrogen at bay. It eliminates unwanted tastes and odors as well. Together, these features make it an ideal compound for use in this essential industrial niche.

Facing future water treatment challenges

While the chemical companies and other entities that support water treatment operations in the U.S. and abroad have managed to achieve significant success, numerous challenges lie ahead. Crumbling infrastructure is perhaps the most pressing for all parties. The American national drinking water delivery system, which is centered on fixtures installed 75 to 100 years ago, is falling apart, according to field analysis from the American Society of Civil Engineers. For chemical companies, other infrastructure problems, including deteriorating domestic railways, roadways and waterways, complicate logistics, creating further water supply risk. In addition to infrastructure-related hardships, chemical companies are coping with product-centric issues related to the increased regulation of disinfection byproduct, per the ACC.

However, chemical companies are up to the task. Many are providing products to supplement decaying water delivery infrastructure and ensure communities can access safe H20. They are also adjusting their supply chains to combat logistical issues and looking into new disinfectants to meet federal regulations and put residents at ease. In the end, these efforts will strengthen the industry and, by extension, the water treatment operations it supports across the globe.